The Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences is pleased to announce the following network-wide graduate courses in mathematical sciences. These courses are available online and provide access to experts from throughout the PIMS network.

Students at Canadian PIMS member universities may apply for graduate credit via the Western Deans' Agreement (WDA). Please be advised, in some cases students must enroll 6 weeks in advance of the term start date and will typically be required to pay ancillary fees to the host institution (as much as $250) or explicitly request exemptions. Please see the WDA section for details of fees at specific sites, and check the individual courses below for registration details.

Students at universities not covered by the WDA but which are part of the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS) may still be eligible to register for this course under the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA). Details of this program vary by university and are also typically subject to ancillary fees. Please contact your local Graduate Student Advisor for more information.

Upcoming Courses

The courses in this section are accepting registrations. Expand each item to see the course details and registration information.

Algebraic Topology

Instructor(s)

Prerequisites

  • A course in general topology, or metric space topology.

  • A course in group theory.

Registration

This course is available for registration under the Western Dean's Agreement but registrations must be approved by the course instructor. Please contact the instructor (using the email link to the left) including details of how you meet the course prerequisites. Next, you must complete the Western Deans' Agreement form , with the following course details:

Course Name
Algebraic Topology
Course Number
MATH 842
Section Number
001
Section Code
12051

Completed forms should be returned to your graduate advisor who will sign it and take the required steps. For students at PIMS sites, please see this list to find your graduate advisor, for other sites, contacts can be found on the Western Deans' Agreement contact page .

The Western Deans' Agreement provides an automatic tuition fee waiver for visiting students. Graduate students paying normal required tuition fees at their home institution will not pay tuition fees to the host institution. However, students will typically be be required to pay other ancillary fees to the host institution, or explicitly request exemptions (e.g. Insurance or travel fees). Details vary by university, so please contact the graduate student advisor at your institution for help completing the form. Links to fee information and contact information for PIMS member universities is available below in the WDA section.

Students at universities not covered by the WDA but which are part of the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS) may still be eligible to register for this course under the terms of the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA). Details of this program vary by university and are also typically subject to ancillary fees. Please contact your local graduate student advisor for more information.

Abstract

The course is a first semester in algebraic topology. Broadly speaking, algebraic topology studies the shape of spaces by assigning algebraic invariants to them. Topics will include the fundamental group, covering spaces, CW complexes, homology (simplicial, singular, cellular), cohomology, and some applications.

Syllabus

syllabus.pdf

Other Information

Reference texts:

Algebraic Topology with Applications in Combinatorics

Instructor(s)

Prerequisites

  • Topological spaces

  • Continuous maps

  • Metric space topology

  • Quotient topology

  • Compactness

  • Basic notions about simplicial complexes, fundamental groups and covering spaces will be helpful, but students will also be given opportunity to self-study about these notions during the first month of the course and help will be offered during tutorials.

Registration

This course is available for registration under the Western Dean's Agreement but registrations must be approved by the course instructor. Please contact the instructor (using the email link to the left) including details of how you meet the course prerequisites. Next, you must complete the Western Deans' Agreement form , with the following course details:

Course Name
Math 841 Topology: Special Topics
Course Number
MATH 841
Section Number
Section Code

Completed forms should be returned to your graduate advisor who will sign it and take the required steps. For students at PIMS sites, please see this list to find your graduate advisor, for other sites, contacts can be found on the Western Deans' Agreement contact page .

The Western Deans' Agreement provides an automatic tuition fee waiver for visiting students. Graduate students paying normal required tuition fees at their home institution will not pay tuition fees to the host institution. However, students will typically be be required to pay other ancillary fees to the host institution, or explicitly request exemptions (e.g. Insurance or travel fees). Details vary by university, so please contact the graduate student advisor at your institution for help completing the form. Links to fee information and contact information for PIMS member universities is available below in the WDA section.

Students at universities not covered by the WDA but which are part of the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS) may still be eligible to register for this course under the terms of the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA). Details of this program vary by university and are also typically subject to ancillary fees. Please contact your local graduate student advisor for more information.

Abstract

This is a basic level graduate course with introduction to algebraic topology and its applications in combinatorics, graph theory and geometry. The course will cover introductory chapters from [1] and parts of [2]. With a guest lecture by Nati Linial from Israel, we will also touch some recent topics like the topology of random simplicial complexes. The instructor expects that students with interests in topology and those with interests in discrete mathematics and geometry would find the course suitable.

Syllabus

This is a basic level graduate course with introduction to algebraic topology and its applications in combinatorics, graph theory and geometry. The course will start with a brief review of the basic notions of topology, including the notions mentioned as prerequisites. It will continue with introductory chapters from Hatcher’s textbook [1]. Simplicial complex. Cell complex. Homotopy and fundamental group (Sections 1.1-1.3 and 1.A). Homology (Sections 2.1-2.2 and parts of 2.A-2.C). The second part of the course will concentrate on various applications of algebraic topology in combinatorics, graph theory, and geometry. We will follow relevant chapters from Matousek’s book [2]. Some of those applications use Borsuk-Ulam Theorem, which will be covered first. Time permitting, we may touch a recent flourishing topics on the topology of random simplicial complexes.

Other Information

Reference texts

  • [1] A. Hatcher, Algebraic Topology, Cambridge University Press, 2002. (Available for free download from http://pi.math.cornell.edu/~hatcher/AT/ATpage.html).
  • [2] J. Matousek, Using the Borsuk–Ulam Theorem - Lectures on Topological Methods in Combinatorics and Geometry, Springer, 2003.

Course Delivery

The weekly schedule will consist of four 50-minute lectures. Two to three of them will be giving new material, with some details left for the students to cover by themselves from the provided textbooks. The remaining weekly time will be used for tutorials, covering problems and examples, explaining details of proofs, and having students work in small groups and report on their solutions. The online platform used will be Zoom, with synchronous teaching that will be recorded for asynchronous viewing.

Grading Scheme

  • Homework 20%
  • Midterm 30%
  • Final 50%

The instructor reserves the right to limit the number of students from outside of SFU. He will allow for additional students who will not take the course for credit (their homework and exams will not be graded).

Cantor Minimal Dynamics

Instructor(s)

Prerequisites

  • A good course in abstract algebra, up to the first isomorphism theorem and a good course in general topology. The course is accessible to advanced undergraduates with a good background.

Registration

This course is available for registration under the Western Dean's Agreement but registrations must be approved by the course instructor. Please contact the instructor (using the email link to the left) including details of how you meet the course prerequisites. Next, you must complete the Western Deans' Agreement form , with the following course details:

Course Name
Topology
Course Number
MATH 540
Section Number
A01
Section Code

Completed forms should be returned to your graduate advisor who will sign it and take the required steps. For students at PIMS sites, please see this list to find your graduate advisor, for other sites, contacts can be found on the Western Deans' Agreement contact page .

The Western Deans' Agreement provides an automatic tuition fee waiver for visiting students. Graduate students paying normal required tuition fees at their home institution will not pay tuition fees to the host institution. However, students will typically be be required to pay other ancillary fees to the host institution, or explicitly request exemptions (e.g. Insurance or travel fees). Details vary by university, so please contact the graduate student advisor at your institution for help completing the form. Links to fee information and contact information for PIMS member universities is available below in the WDA section.

Students at universities not covered by the WDA but which are part of the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS) may still be eligible to register for this course under the terms of the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA). Details of this program vary by university and are also typically subject to ancillary fees. Please contact your local graduate student advisor for more information.

Abstract

The official title ‘Topology’ of this course is misleading. A better one would be ‘Topics in Dynamical Systems’. Dynamical systems is the mathematical study of models based on the idea of a topological space, representing the possible configurations of a system and a continuous map (or maps) which represent its time evolution. The systems considered in this course have two additional features: the space is compact and totally disconnected while the map is minimal in the sense that every trajectory formed by iteration on a single point is dense. Such spaces have a strongly combinatorial feel to them and one of our main goals is o provide a complete model for such systems based purely on combinatorial data called a Bratteli diagram. This model has been used extensively in topological dynamics over the last thirty years. The second main topic is to introduce a purely algebraic invariant for such systems. So the course becomes an interesting mix, moving between combinatorics, algebra and topology or dynamical systems. The overall goal is a theorem which classifies such systems up to a notion of orbit equivalence. Primarily, we will aim to understand all of the ingredients for the theorem and have some idea of how to prove it.

Other Information

Textbook

The text is the book Cantor MInimal Systems, written by the lecturer and published by the AMS:

It is my intention to cover all 14 Chapters, at least partially.

Grading Scheme

The grading scheme for the course will be six assignments, due roughly every two weeks. They will be weighted equally and the lowest score will be dropped before computing a final grade. There will be no tests. Students will be expected to submit their own work only, but may feel free to discuss the problems with others.

Schedule

The course will be online: lectures Monday and Thursday from 11:30 am to 12:50 pm. I intend to use the first part of each lecture as a discussion for the entire class. Depending on how long these take, it may be necessary to supplement the material with recorded (i.e. asynchronous) lectures.

Comparative Prime Number Theory

Instructor(s)

Prerequisites

  • Solid course (preferably graduate-level) in elementary number theory

  • Graduate level course in analytic number theory, one that includes a proof of the prime number theorem and the corresponding "explicit formula"

  • Undergraduate course in probability would also be helpful

Registration

This course is available for registration under the Western Dean's Agreement but registrations must be approved by the course instructor. Please contact the instructor (using the email link to the left) including details of how you meet the course prerequisites. Next, you must complete the Western Deans' Agreement form , with the following course details:

Course Name
Comparative Prime Number Theory
Course Number
MATH 613D
Section Number
201
Section Code

Completed forms should be returned to your graduate advisor who will sign it and take the required steps. For students at PIMS sites, please see this list to find your graduate advisor, for other sites, contacts can be found on the Western Deans' Agreement contact page .

The Western Deans' Agreement provides an automatic tuition fee waiver for visiting students. Graduate students paying normal required tuition fees at their home institution will not pay tuition fees to the host institution. However, students will typically be be required to pay other ancillary fees to the host institution, or explicitly request exemptions (e.g. Insurance or travel fees). Details vary by university, so please contact the graduate student advisor at your institution for help completing the form. Links to fee information and contact information for PIMS member universities is available below in the WDA section.

Students at universities not covered by the WDA but which are part of the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS) may still be eligible to register for this course under the terms of the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA). Details of this program vary by university and are also typically subject to ancillary fees. Please contact your local graduate student advisor for more information.

Abstract

We will begin with a quick review of the prime number theorem and the “explicit formula”, then develop the theory of Dirichlet characters, and combine these two sets of tools to prove the prime number theorem in arithmetic progressions. We will then move into comparing two counting functions of primes in arithmetic progressions, going through the history of such comparisons and learning how the normalized difference can be modeled by random variables, thus giving us a way to understand its limiting distribution. Student assessment will consist of some modest combination of presentations and reviews of research articles.

Recommended prerequisites are a solid course (preferably graduate-level) in elementary number theory, and a graduate-level course in analytic number theory, one that included a proof of the prime number theorem and the corresponding explicit formula. An undergraduate course in probability would also be helpful. Reference texts would be standard analytic number theory books by Iwaniec & Kowalski, by Montgomery & Vaughan, and by Titchmarsh. Students who are willing to learn some of this background as they go are welcome.

Classes will be held live (synchronously) on Zoom and regular attendance will be important. The current tentative schedule is to meet at 10am Pacific time on Mondays and Wednesdays and possibly Fridays. Students can join from any physical location.

Other Information

Reference Texts

Reference texts would be standard analytic number theory books by Iwaniec & Kowalski, by Montgomery & Vaughan, and by Titchmarsh.

Stochastic Differential Equations

Instructor(s)

Prerequisites

  • Some preparation on mathematical analysis and probability theory

Registration

This course is available for registration under the Western Dean's Agreement but registrations must be approved by the course instructor. Please contact the instructor (using the email link to the left) including details of how you meet the course prerequisites. Next, you must complete the Western Deans' Agreement form , with the following course details:

Course Name
Stochastic Differential Equations
Course Number
Math 663
Section Number
Topics in Applied Mathematics I: Stochastic differential equations
Section Code
N/A

Completed forms should be returned to your graduate advisor who will sign it and take the required steps. For students at PIMS sites, please see this list to find your graduate advisor, for other sites, contacts can be found on the Western Deans' Agreement contact page .

The Western Deans' Agreement provides an automatic tuition fee waiver for visiting students. Graduate students paying normal required tuition fees at their home institution will not pay tuition fees to the host institution. However, students will typically be be required to pay other ancillary fees to the host institution, or explicitly request exemptions (e.g. Insurance or travel fees). Details vary by university, so please contact the graduate student advisor at your institution for help completing the form. Links to fee information and contact information for PIMS member universities is available below in the WDA section.

Students at universities not covered by the WDA but which are part of the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS) may still be eligible to register for this course under the terms of the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA). Details of this program vary by university and are also typically subject to ancillary fees. Please contact your local graduate student advisor for more information.

Abstract

This is a one semester three credit hour course and meet twice a week, tentatively Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:00-12:20. It is about the theory and applications of stochastic differential equations driven by Brownian motion. The stochastic differential equations have found applications in finance, signal processing, population dynamics and many other fields. It is the basis of some other applied probability areas such as filtering theory, stochastic control and stochastic differential games. To balance the theoretical and applied aspects and to include as much audience as possible, we shall focus on the stochastic differential equations driven only by Brownian motion (white noise). We will focus on the theory and not get into specific applied area (such as finance, signal processing, filtering, control and so on). We shall first briefly introduce some basic concepts and results on stochastic processes, in particular the Brownian motions. Then we will discuss stochastic integrals, Ito formula, the existence and uniqueness of stochastic differential equations, some fundamental properties of the solution. We will concern with the Markov property, Kolmogorov backward and forward equations, Feynman-Kac formula, Girsanov formula. We will also concern with the ergodic theory and other stability problems. We may also mention some results on numerical simulations, Malliavin calculus and so on.

Syllabus

hu_sde_abstract_2021.pdf

Other Information

Reference Texts

  • The main reference book for this course is
    • Øksendal, B. Stochastic differential equations. An introduction with applications. Sixth edition. Universitext. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2003. xxiv+360 pp. ISBN: 3-540-04758-1
    • Karatzas, Ioannis; Shreve, Steven E. Brownian motion and stochastic calculus. Second edition. Graduate Texts in Mathematics, 113. Springer-Verlag, New York, 1991. xxiv+470 pp. ISBN: 0-387-97655-8
    • Klebaner, Fima C. Introduction to stochastic calculus with applications. Third edition. Imperial College Press, London, 2012. xiv+438 pp. ISBN: 978-1-84816-832-9; 1-84816-832-2
  • Other references
    • Ikeda, N.; Watanabe, S. Stochastic differential equations and diffusion processes. Second edition. North-Holland Mathematical Library, 24. North-Holland Publishing Co., Amsterdam; Kodansha, Ltd., Tokyo, 1989. xvi+555 pp. ISBN: 0-444-87378-3 * Protter, P. E. Stochastic integration and differential equations. Second edition. Version 2.1. Corrected third printing. Stochastic Modelling and Applied Probability, 21. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2005. xiv+419 pp. ISBN: 3-540-00313-4
    • Revuz, D.; Yor, M. Continuous martingales and Brownian motion. Third edition. Grundlehren der Mathematischen Wissenschaften [Fundamental Principles of Mathematical Sciences], 293. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1999. xiv+602 pp.
    • Durrett, R. Stochastic calculus. A practical introduction. Probability and Stochastics Series. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 1996. x+341 pp. ISBN: 0-8493-8071-5
    • Jeanblanc, M.; Yor, M.; Chesney, M. Mathematical methods for financial markets. Springer Finance. Springer-Verlag London, Ltd., London, 2009. xxvi+732 pp. ISBN: 978-1-85233-376-8
    • Hasminskii, R. Z. Stochastic stability of differential equations. Translated from the Russian by D. Louvish. Monographs and Textbooks on Mechanics of Solids and Fluids: Mechanics and Analysis, 7. Sijthoff & Noordhoff, Alphen aan den RijnGermantown, Md., 1980. xvi+344 pp. ISBN: 90-286-0100-7
    • Hu, Y. Analysis on Gaussian spaces. World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., Hackensack, NJ, 2017. xi+470 pp. ISBN: 978-981-3142-17-6
    • Kloeden, P. E.; Platen, E. Numerical solution of stochastic differential equations. Applications of Mathematics (New York), 23. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1992. xxxvi+632 pp. ISBN: 3-540-54062-8

Design and Analysis of Experiments

Instructor(s)

Prerequisites

  • Linear Algebra: vectors, matrices, quadratic forms, orthogonality, projections, eigenvalues.

  • Calculus: basic multivariate differential calculus such as computing gradients and finding critical points.

  • Statistics: an understanding of estimation and hypothesis testing, knowledge of linear regression is helpful.

  • Discrete Math: familiarity with topics like basic group theory and combinatorics can help, but are not required

Registration

This course is available for registration under the Western Dean's Agreement but registrations must be approved by the course instructor. Please contact the instructor (using the email link to the left) including details of how you meet the course prerequisites. Next, you must complete the Western Deans' Agreement form , with the following course details:

Course Name
Design and Analysis of Experiments
Course Number
STAT568
Section Number
STAT568 - R1
Section Code
45966

Completed forms should be returned to your graduate advisor who will sign it and take the required steps. For students at PIMS sites, please see this list to find your graduate advisor, for other sites, contacts can be found on the Western Deans' Agreement contact page .

The Western Deans' Agreement provides an automatic tuition fee waiver for visiting students. Graduate students paying normal required tuition fees at their home institution will not pay tuition fees to the host institution. However, students will typically be be required to pay other ancillary fees to the host institution, or explicitly request exemptions (e.g. Insurance or travel fees). Details vary by university, so please contact the graduate student advisor at your institution for help completing the form. Links to fee information and contact information for PIMS member universities is available below in the WDA section.

Students at universities not covered by the WDA but which are part of the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS) may still be eligible to register for this course under the terms of the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA). Details of this program vary by university and are also typically subject to ancillary fees. Please contact your local graduate student advisor for more information.

Abstract

We will cover classical and modern methods of experimental design starting with one-way ANOVA and Cochran’s Theorem. From there, we will consider multi-factor ANOVA using a variety of combinatorial tools such as Graeco-Latin squares and incomplete block designs. There will be a brief interlude on multiple testing followed by 2 and 3 level factorial designs, fractional factorial designs, and blocking within such designs. Then, response surface designs—i.e. quadratic polynomial surfaces used for optimization of industrial processes–will be discussed. Lastly, more advanced topics will be touched on such as prime-level factorial designs and the Plackett-Burman design, which involves Hadamard matrices. Interesting datasets, connections to optimal coding theory, and at-home experiments will also be discussed. For study purposes, discussion questions will be included with the lectures and solutions will be discussed in class.

Syllabus

stat568_syllabus2021.pdf

Other Information

Reference texts

Ergodic Theory

Instructor(s)

Prerequisites

  • Graduate Real Analysis

Registration

This course is available for registration under the Western Dean's Agreement but registrations must be approved by the course instructor. Please contact the instructor (using the email link to the left) including details of how you meet the course prerequisites. Next, you must complete the Western Deans' Agreement form , with the following course details:

Course Name
Ergodic Theory
Course Number
Not yet available (see below)
Section Number
Section Code

Completed forms should be returned to your graduate advisor who will sign it and take the required steps. For students at PIMS sites, please see this list to find your graduate advisor, for other sites, contacts can be found on the Western Deans' Agreement contact page .

The Western Deans' Agreement provides an automatic tuition fee waiver for visiting students. Graduate students paying normal required tuition fees at their home institution will not pay tuition fees to the host institution. However, students will typically be be required to pay other ancillary fees to the host institution, or explicitly request exemptions (e.g. Insurance or travel fees). Details vary by university, so please contact the graduate student advisor at your institution for help completing the form. Links to fee information and contact information for PIMS member universities is available below in the WDA section.

Students at universities not covered by the WDA but which are part of the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS) may still be eligible to register for this course under the terms of the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA). Details of this program vary by university and are also typically subject to ancillary fees. Please contact your local graduate student advisor for more information.

Abstract

Ergodic theory is the study of dynamical systems from a measurable or statistical point of view. Starting with Poincaré’s recurrence theorem and the ergodic theorems of Birkoff and von Neumann ergodic theory in the early twentieth century. The field has applications to many other areas of mathematics including probability, number theory and harmonic analysis. Among the topics covered will be

  • examples of ergodic systems
  • the mean and pointwise ergodic theorems
  • mixing conditions
  • recurrence
  • entropy and
  • the Ornstein’s Isomorphism Theorem.

Course Website

https://canvas.ubc.ca/courses/59429

Other Information

Registration

This course will run between April and June of 2021, and is not yet open for registration. Registration details will be posted here when they are available and will be required by February 15th, 2021.

Reference texts

  • Ergodic Theory by Karl Petersen

Introduction to Vertex Algebras and Their Representation Theory

Instructor(s)

Prerequisites

  • Graduate level abstract algebra and complex analysis. Knowledge to Lie algebras would be helpful but not essential.

Registration

This course is available for registration under the Western Dean's Agreement but registrations must be approved by the course instructor. Please contact the instructor (using the email link to the left) including details of how you meet the course prerequisites. Next, you must complete the Western Deans' Agreement form , with the following course details:

Course Name
Introduction to Vertex Algebras and Their Representation Theory
Course Number
MATH 8510
Section Number
Section Code

Completed forms should be returned to your graduate advisor who will sign it and take the required steps. For students at PIMS sites, please see this list to find your graduate advisor, for other sites, contacts can be found on the Western Deans' Agreement contact page .

The Western Deans' Agreement provides an automatic tuition fee waiver for visiting students. Graduate students paying normal required tuition fees at their home institution will not pay tuition fees to the host institution. However, students will typically be be required to pay other ancillary fees to the host institution, or explicitly request exemptions (e.g. Insurance or travel fees). Details vary by university, so please contact the graduate student advisor at your institution for help completing the form. Links to fee information and contact information for PIMS member universities is available below in the WDA section.

Students at universities not covered by the WDA but which are part of the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS) may still be eligible to register for this course under the terms of the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA). Details of this program vary by university and are also typically subject to ancillary fees. Please contact your local graduate student advisor for more information.

Abstract

Vertex algebras are algebraic structures formed by the vertex operators that appear both in mathematics and in physics. In mathematics, vertex algebras are used to study the Monster group, the largest finite simple group. The representation theory of vertex algebras gives a mathematical construction to two-dimensional conformal field theories. In this course, we will take an axiomatic approach and focus on the definition, axioms, properties and examples. If time permits, we will also introduce the theory of vertex tensor categories associated to the modules for the vertex operator algebras.

Syllabus

  • 1 - 5 are core materials of the course and will be evaluated in the problem sets and final exam.
  • 6 - 8 are advanced topics that can possibly lead to research papers.
  1. Formal Calculus
  2. Axioms of vertex algebras and modules.
  3. Representations of vertex algebras.
  4. Local systems and the construction theorem.
  5. Examples: vertex algebras constructed from
    1. Virosoro algebra;
    2. Affine Lie algebras;
    3. Lattices
  6. Intertwining operators and tensor products of modules.
  7. Cofiniteness conditions and convergence problems.
  8. Vertex tensor categories of modules for rational vertex operator algebras.

Course Website

https://server.math.umanitoba.ca/~qif

Other Information

Reference texts

  1. Lepowsky-Li, Introduction to vertex algebras and its representation theory
  2. Vertex Operator Algebras and the Monster by Igor Frenkel, James Lepowsky, and Arne Meurman
  3. A series of papers by Yi-Zhi Huang, Jim Lepowsky and Lin Zhang on intertwining operators and vertex tensor categories.

Mathematical Data Science

Instructor(s)

Prerequisites

  • Working knowledge of probability and linear algebra

  • No prior knowledge on graph theory is assumed

Registration

This course is available for registration under the Western Dean's Agreement but registrations must be approved by the course instructor. Please contact the instructor (using the email link to the left) including details of how you meet the course prerequisites. Next, you must complete the Western Deans' Agreement form , with the following course details:

Course Name
Mathematical Data Science
Course Number
EECE 571W
Section Number
202
Section Code

Completed forms should be returned to your graduate advisor who will sign it and take the required steps. For students at PIMS sites, please see this list to find your graduate advisor, for other sites, contacts can be found on the Western Deans' Agreement contact page .

The Western Deans' Agreement provides an automatic tuition fee waiver for visiting students. Graduate students paying normal required tuition fees at their home institution will not pay tuition fees to the host institution. However, students will typically be be required to pay other ancillary fees to the host institution, or explicitly request exemptions (e.g. Insurance or travel fees). Details vary by university, so please contact the graduate student advisor at your institution for help completing the form. Links to fee information and contact information for PIMS member universities is available below in the WDA section.

Students at universities not covered by the WDA but which are part of the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS) may still be eligible to register for this course under the terms of the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA). Details of this program vary by university and are also typically subject to ancillary fees. Please contact your local graduate student advisor for more information.

Abstract

A large variety of data science and machine learning problems use graphs to characterize the structural properties of the data. In social networks, graphs represent friendship among users. In biological networks, graphs indicate protein interactions. In the World Wide Web, graphs describe hyperlinks between web pages. In recommendation systems, graphs reveal the economic behaviors of users. Unlike the one-dimensional linear data sequence, data appearing in the form of a graph can be viewed as a two-dimensional matrix with special structures. How to compress, store, process, estimate, predict, and learn such large-scale structural information are important new challenges in data science. This course will provide an introduction to mathematical and algorithmic tools for studying such problems. Both information-theoretic methods for determining the fundamental limits as well as methodologies for attaining these limits will be discussed. The course aims to expose students to the state- of-the-art research in mathematical data science, statistical inference on graphs, combinatorial statistics, among others, and prepare them with related research skills.

Syllabus

  • Random graphs (basic notions in graph theory, Erdös–Rényi graph, threshold phenomenon)
  • Tools from the probabilistic method (first and second moment method, the method of moments)
  • Vertex degrees (degree distribution, graph isomorphism algorithm
  • Connectivity
  • Small subgraphs (thresholds, asymptotic distributions)
  • Spectral method (graph Laplacian, graph cut interpretation, perturbation of eigenstructures)
  • Basic random matrix theory, pertubation theory
  • Semidefinite programming
  • Applications (Planted clique problem, community detection, graph matching, sorting and ranking)

Course Website

https://canvas.ubc.ca/courses/59429

Other Information

Textbooks

All ebooks are available at https://www.library.ubc.ca/.

  1. Alan Frieze and Michał Karon ́ ski, Introduction to Random Graphs, Cambridge University Press, 2015
  2. Béla Bollobás, Random Graphs, 2nd Edition, Cambridge University Press, 2001.
  3. Svante Janson, Tomasz Łuczak, and Andrzej Rucinski, Random Graphs, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2000.
  4. Noga Alon and Joel H. Spencer, The Probabilistic Method, 4th Edition, Wiley, 2016.

Assessment scheme

  • Grading: Homework 50% and paper reading 50% (presentations 20%, critical reviews 15%, in-class participation in discussing the paper 15%).
  • Homework assignment: In the first half of the course, homework will be assigned every other week on Tuesday and due the Tuesday in two weeks. You are allowed, even encouraged, to work on the homework in small groups, but you must write up your own homework to hand in. If you use materials other than the textbooks and lecture notes — this applies to having discussions with classmates or searching the Internet — please acknowledge the source clearly.
  • Paper reading seminar: The second half of the course will be paper reading seminars. One research paper will be discussed per lecture. Students work in groups. One group is responsible in thoroughly understanding the paper and giving a 40 min summary in class. Remaining groups write critical reviews of the paper before the lecture. Each lecture, there will be a presentation around an hour (40 min technical summary with questions during the presentation), followed by a 20 min discussion about limitations, comparisons, potential improvements, future directions of the paper.
    • Paper list and assignment will be provided.
    • Depending on registration numbers, each group presents 1 paper and writes critical reviews for the remaining papers (one review per group per paper). Guidance on how to structure a presentation and how to review a paper will be provided.
    • The presenting group is required to meet the instructor during office hour (or by appointment) to discuss the planned presentation at least two weeks before the lecture.
    • Both the presenting group and the reviewing groups should attend the paper reading seminars.

Parallel Programming for Scientific Computing

Instructor(s)

Prerequisites

  • Basic background in programming and numerical analysis desirable

Registration

This course is available for registration under the Western Dean's Agreement but registrations must be approved by the course instructor. Please contact the instructor (using the email link to the left) including details of how you meet the course prerequisites. Next, you must complete the Western Deans' Agreement form , with the following course details:

Course Name
Parallel Programming for Scientific Computing
Course Number
CMPT 851.3
Section Number
02
Section Code
23923

Completed forms should be returned to your graduate advisor who will sign it and take the required steps. For students at PIMS sites, please see this list to find your graduate advisor, for other sites, contacts can be found on the Western Deans' Agreement contact page .

The Western Deans' Agreement provides an automatic tuition fee waiver for visiting students. Graduate students paying normal required tuition fees at their home institution will not pay tuition fees to the host institution. However, students will typically be be required to pay other ancillary fees to the host institution, or explicitly request exemptions (e.g. Insurance or travel fees). Details vary by university, so please contact the graduate student advisor at your institution for help completing the form. Links to fee information and contact information for PIMS member universities is available below in the WDA section.

Students at universities not covered by the WDA but which are part of the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS) may still be eligible to register for this course under the terms of the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA). Details of this program vary by university and are also typically subject to ancillary fees. Please contact your local graduate student advisor for more information.

Abstract

Despite the extraordinary advances in computing technology, we continue to need ever greater computing power to address important fundamental scientific questions. Because individual compute processors have essentially reached their performance limits, the need for greater computing power can only be met through the use of parallel computers. This course is intended for students who are interested in learning how to take advantage of high-performance computing with the focus of writing parallel code for processor-intensive applications to be run on local clusters, the cloud, or shared infrastructure such as that provided by Compute Canada. Extensive use of pertinent and practical examples from scientific computing will be made throughout. Allowable programming languages include Julia, Matlab, Maple, sage, python, Fortran, or C/C++. Various paradigms of parallel computing will be covered via the OpenMP, MPI, and OpenCL libraries. By the end of the course, students will be expected to be able to correctly solve non-trivial problems involving parallel programming as well as appreciate the issues involved in solving such problems.

Syllabus

syllabus_CMPT851_W2021.pdf

Other Information

Reference texts

  • D.L. Chopp, Introduction to High Performance Scientific Computing, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, 2019.

Previous Courses

The courses in this section are no longer accepting registrations. Expand each item to see a course abstract

Process-Based Hydrological Modelling

Instructor(s)

Prerequisites

  • A firm foundation in calculus and physics at the first year university level

  • Some experience in computing (e.g. Familiarity with python, R, matlab)

  • A strong background in hydrology e.g. As obtained by taking Geography 827 "Principles of Hydrology" at the University of Saskatchewan or a similar graduate-level course in hydrology.

Registration

Registration for this course is not currently available.

Abstract

The University of Saskatchewan Centre for Hydrology is offering an intensive course on the fundamentals of process-based hydrological modelling, including model development, model application, and model evaluation. The course will explain the model constructs that are necessary to simulate dominant hydrological processes, the assumptions that are embedded in models of different type and complexity, and best practices for model development and model applications. The course will cover the full model ecosystem, including the spatial discretization of the model domain, input forcing data generation, model evaluation, parameter estimation, post-processing, uncertainty characterization, data assimilation, and ensemble streamflow forecasting methods. The overall intent of the course is to provide participants with the understanding and tools that are necessary to develop and apply models across a broad range of landscapes. Specifically, the course will convey an understanding of how to represent existing process understanding in numerical models, how to devise meaningful model experiments, and how to evaluate these experiments in a systematic way. Along the way, participants will have the opportunity to build models, run models, make changes, and analyze model output.

Course Website

https://research-groups.usask.ca/hydrology/training-education/intensive-courses/geog-825.php#CourseObjectives

Other Information

Reference Texts

Reading/Textbooks

  1. Clark, M. P., Y. Fan, D. M. Lawrence, J. C. Adam, D. Bolster, D. J. Gochis, . . . X. Zeng, 2015a: Improving the representation of hydrologic processes in Earth System Models. Water Resources Research, 51, 5929-5956, doi: 10.1002/2015WR017096.
  2. Clark, M. P., B. Nijssen, J. D. Lundquist, D. Kavetski, D. E. Rupp, R. A. Woods, . . . R. M. Rasmussen, 2015b: A unified approach for process-based hydrologic modeling: 1. Modeling concept. Water Resources Research, 51, 2498-2514, doi: 10.1002/2015WR017198.
  3. Clark, M. P., B. Nijssen, J. D. Lundquist, D. Kavetski, D. E. Rupp, R. A. Woods, . . . D. G. Marks, 2015c: A unified approach for process-based hydrologic modeling: 2. Model implementation and case studies. Water Resources Research, 51, 2515-2542, doi: 10.1002/2015WR017200.
  4. Clark, M. P., B. Schaefli, S. J. Schymanski, L. Samaniego, C. H. Luce, B. M. Jackson, . . . S. Ceola, 2016: Improving the theoretical underpinnings of process-based hydrologic models. Water Resources Research, 52, 2350-2365, doi: 10.1002/2015WR017910
  5. Clark, M. P., M. F. P. Bierkens, L. Samaniego, R. A. Woods, R. Uijlenhoet, K. E. Bennett, . . . C. D. Peters-Lidard, 2017: The evolution of process-based hydrologic models: historical challenges and the collective quest for physical realism. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 21, 3427-3440, doi: 10.5194/hess-21-3427-2017

Graph Theory

Instructor(s)

  • Karen Meagher

    University of Regina

  • Joy Morris

    University of Lethbridge

  • Karen Gunderson

    University of Manitoba

Prerequisites

    Registration

    Registration for this course is not currently available.

    Abstract

    The Fall 2020 offering of Math 827, Graph Theory will consist of three units on advanced graph theory topics.

    The first unit will be 6 weeks will be on algebraic techniques in graph theory taught by Dr. Karen Meagher of the University of Regina. The focus will be on spectral graph theory, adjacency matrices and eigenvalues of graphs. We will consider important families of transitive graphs where algebraic methods are particularly effective.

    The second unit will be 3 weeks on Cayley graphs, taught by Dr. Joy Morris from the University of Lethbridge. This unit will focus on automorphisms, isomorphisms and the isomorphism problem, and Hamilton cycles, all in the context of Cayley graphs.

    The third unit will be 3 weeks on the topic of random graphs taught by Dr Karen Gunderson from the University of Manitoba. This unit will cover various models of random graphs and some types of pseudorandomness.

    Other Information

    Mathematical Modeling of Complex Fluids

    Instructor(s)

    Prerequisites

      Registration

      Registration for this course is not currently available.

      Abstract

      This course will give students an overview of Non-Newtonian Fluid Dynamics, and discuss two approaches to building constitutive models for complex fluids: continuum modeling and kinetic- microstructural modeling. In addition, it will provide an introduction to multiphase complex fluids and to numerical models and algorithms for computing complex fluid flows.

      Syllabus

      1. Introduction
        • Background and motivation
        • Review of required mathematics
      2. Continuum theories
        • Oldroyd’s theory for viscoelastic fluids
        • Ericksen-Leslie theory for liquid crystals
        • Viscoplastic theories
      3. Kinetic-microstructural theories
        • Dumbbell theory for polymer solutions
        • Bead-rod-chain theories
        • Doi-Edwards theory for entangled systems
        • Doi theory for liquid crystalline materials
      4. Heterogeneous/multiphase systems
        • Suspension theories (Einstein, Taylor, Batchelor, etc.)
        • Kinetic theory for emulsions and drop dynamics
        • Energetic formalism for interfacial dynamics
        • Numerical methods for moving boundary problems
      5. Applications
        • Polymer processing
        • Sedimentation and Fluidization
        • Bio-materials and processes: Pattern formation and self-assembly
        • Others (gels, surfactants, colloids, Marangoni flows, etc.)

      Other Information

      Optimal Transport + X

      Instructor(s)

      Prerequisites

        Registration

        Registration for this course is not currently available.

        Abstract

        This course is part of a long-term initiative to develop integrated teaching and learning optimal transport infrastructure connecting the various PIMS sites. The plan is to offer this course several times over the next few years; in each iteration, ‘X’ will be chosen from the many disciplines in which optimal transport places an important role, including data science/statistics, computation, biology,finance, etc. In Fall, 2020 we will take ‘X’=“economics”.

        Other Information

        This course is part of a long-term initiative to develop integrated teaching and learning optimal transport infrastructure connecting the various PIMS sites. The plan is to offer this course several times over the next few years; in each iteration, ‘X’ will be chosen from the many disciplines in which optimal transport places an important role, including data science/statistics, computation, biology,finance, etc. In Fall, 2020 we will take ‘X’=“economics”.

        This course has two main objectives: first, to introduce a wide range of students to the exciting and broadly applicable research area of optimal transport, and second, to explore more closely its applications in a particular field, which will vary from year to year (represented by ‘X’ in the title). Optimal transport is the general problem of moving one distribution of mass to another as efficiently as possible (for example, think of using a pile of dirt to fill a hole of the same volume, so as to minimize the average distance moved). This basic problem has a wealth of applications within mathematics (in PDE, geometry, functional analysis, probability…) as well as in other fields (comparing images in image processing, comparing and interpolating between data sets in statistics, matching partners in economics, aligning electrons in chemical physics…) and is currently an extremely active research area.

        The first part of the course surveys the basic theory of optimal transport. Topics covered include: formulation of the problem, Kantorovich duality theory, existence and uniqueness theory, c-monotonicity and structure of solutions, discrete optimal transport. This is the core part of the course, which is important for all areas of application, and will be largely the same each year, although the presentation of some topics may vary slightly from year to year, to ensure compatibility with ‘X’.

        The second part of the course develops applications in a particular area (corresponding to ‘X’ in the title), which rotates from year to year. In Fall, 2020, we will take ‘X’ = ”economics.” A surprisingly wide variety of problems in economic theory, econometrics and operations research are naturally formulated in terms of optimal transport. As a simple, illustrative example, consider an employer assigning a large number of heterogeneous employees to a diverse set of tasks. The employees have different skill sets which affect their proficiency at different jobs in different ways; matching a particular worker with a particular job results in a surplus which depends on the characteristics of both the worker and job. Assigning the workers to tasks to maximize the overall surplus is an optimal transport problem.

        Many other examples arise in econometrics (where optimal transport can be used to optimize the estimation of incomplete information, or where multi-variate generalizations of quantiles, constructed using optimal transport, can be used to study dependence structures between distributions), matching problems (matching spouses on the marriage market, or employees and employers on the labour market, for instance) industrial organization (screening problems), contract theory (hedonic or discrete choice models), and financial engineering (estimating model free bounds on derivative prices and optimizing portfolios).

        In both parts, we aim to keep the presentation accessible to non-experts, so that students with no prior background in either optimal transport or economics can follow the course.

        Intended audience

        Senior undergraduates, master’s and PhD students in quantitative disciplines, such as pure and applied mathematics, statistics, computer science, economics and engineering. The course potentially may also be attractive to those working in industry with a strong background in one of these areas.

        Instructor

        This iteration of the course will be taught by Brendan Pass, and enhanced by guest lectures from experts in applications of optimal transport in economics and finance.

        Registering for a PIMS digital course via the Western Deans' Agreement

        In order to register in a PIMS digital course for the Western Deans' agreement you must obtain the approval of the course instructor. Once you have obtained their approval please complete the Western Deans' agreement form . The completed form should be returned to your graduate advisor who will sign it and take the required steps. For students at PIMS sites, a list of graduate advisors is given below, contacts for other sites can be found on the Western Deans' Agreement contact page . Note that: The Western Deans' Agreement provides an automatic tuition fee waiver for visiting students. Graduate students paying normal required tuition fees at their home institution will not pay tuition fees to the host institution. However, students will typically be required to pay other ancillary fees to the host institution (as much as $250) or explicitly request exemptions (e.g. Insurance or travel fees).

        University of Alberta

        University of British Columbia

        Please see Student Fees at the University of British Columbia for potential fees and exemption requirements.

        University of Calgary

        University of Lethbridge

        University of Manitoba

        University of Regina

        University of Saskatchewan

        Please see Student Fees at the University of Saskatchwan for potential fees and exemption requirements.

        Simon Fraser University

        Please see Student Fees at Simon Fraser University for potential fees and exemption requirements.

        University of Victoria

        Please see Student Fees at the University of Victoria (“Other fees” section) for potential fees and exemption requirements.

        For help completing the Western Deans' agreement form, please contact the graduate advisor at your institution. For more information about the agreement, please see the Western Deans' Agreement website .